Author Topic: The Guidelines for the UK,mistake?  (Read 2870 times)

Andy Howard

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The Guidelines for the UK,mistake?
« on: October 13, 2013, 04:28:57 PM »
Just read the Guidelines for the UK,it states that if total T is>12 then no treatment but treatment should aim to get levels=>15,this doesn't make sense,if you have a level of say 13 or 14 you don't get treated but if you have a level of say 7 the aim is to get it more than 13 or 14,or have I missed something? Points 3 and 10 on list

nick

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Re: The Guidelines for the UK,mistake?
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2013, 07:42:53 PM »
Hi Andy,

You have read it exactly how it is. The fact is that men suffer symptoms at levels that are considered within the so called normal range but the NHS doesn't treat those men above the arbitrary figure of 12. If you are between 8 and 12, you may well still have a battle to get help. 
However, there are private doctors who will treat when levels are slightly above 12 and symptoms are present. :/

I hope this helps

cheers

Nick

   

Dauntless

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Re: The Guidelines for the UK,mistake?
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2013, 02:14:47 PM »
Thanks for shedding light on this guys. The other thing I find absolutely astonishing is that there is no consideration paid to the patient's age. Madness.

charlysays

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Re: The Guidelines for the UK,mistake?
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 11:06:40 AM »
The "no treatment past 12" rule and "aim for atleast 15" rule is because a man who has say 8 nmol or less (which is the group they will usually treat) will experience a far greater percentage increase in T if his levels are bumped up to 15+ than a man with say 12.2.
Unfortunately you could have a man who's levels were say 22, but for whatever reason they are now down to 13 and they will really struggle to get help or not get any but are very likely to have symptoms.

The fact is you gradually become more at risk of symptoms when the level drops to 15 or less. This is why they aim for 15+ but you have to ask why 15+ is OK for a man who was diagnosed with hypogonadism at a level of 12 but yet a man with 13 may well not get any treatment even though it's known that 1nmol either way makes basically no difference to the body.

That said it really depends on which doctor you see. I know of someone recently who is going to be prescribed TRT on the NHS who's latest total T came back at 12.4. It had been as low as 10 I think. Some time ago it was at 16 but his free T was still low at this level.